Tag Archives: technology

New Scoops – May 3, 2014

13 Very Different Tools To Help Students Find Their Voice

Infographic: Competency-Based Teacher Preparation & Professional Development

How to Be More Productive On Social Media

11 Essential Ingredients Every Blog Post Needs

Moving To Online Teaching: Issues and Resources For Educators – Skilledup.com

21 Ways to Check for Student Understanding

Chalkup: Social Learning Platform, Simple Learning Management.

Jumpstarting Edtech Innovation in Germany (EdSurge News)

Good Bye PIDP 3240

I am writing this on the eve of submitting this blog to my Instuctor Brian Cassell for grading.   This is my 8th blog posting since my Provincial Instructor Diploma Program (PDIP) 3240  “Media Enhanced Learning” course started at the beginning of March.  I set myself the goal of making one blog post per week along with the regular discussion forum postings and journal assignments that were part of the course curriculum.  I was also part of the Social Media component so blogging, Facebook and Twitter became part of my life.

As a “digital immigrant” coming into the digital age of the internet at the age of 48 and someone who’s “smart” phone is an old Blackberry (I just upgraded my old Playbook to a new Samsung Galaxy Note  8.0) this was fairly challenging.  Looking around I can see why the younger “digital natives” are glued to their wireless devices.  Pocket size cell phones can make videos and sound recordings, take photos and within minutes it goes out to a global audience.  Your 15 minutes of fame is just the right #hashtag, likes, hits or social media strategy away.

The most important thing that I learned in the social media component is that I had to develop a social media strategy in order to use the medium effectively.  I learned that people will follow people who provided good content, not just re-tweeting or sharing the latest cat meme.  Google does has its limits so I looked for sites like Scoop.it and Redditt where you can set up tag searches and find content posted by others with a similar interests.  Good content is curated content, ask any librarian.  With the vast amount of dubious content on the internet it is important to verify your sources before posting or reposting their content in order to maintain your own credibility.  This is something that has to be passed on to our students.

I used the keywords:

social media, technology,construction, apprenticeship,teaching and Canada 

as tags and set up the topic of Adult Education in general keying in on Apprenticeship Training in order to narrow my subject field further.  I am interested in teaching in this field upon graduation and I am also teaching some general interest welding and fabricating courses at the Vancouver Community Laboratory (CoLab).  In order to facilitate this I set up two RSS feeds from Google News.  This brings the content right to my blog and it is constantly being updated.  I also have accounts on Redditt and Scoop.it along with my Facebook and Twitter feeds in order to provide more sources for content for my blog.  I recently set up a Facebook page for the blog which I can use to regularly post content to and as I get into the habit, it will be easy to remember to sharing it with the VCC/SIE  Facebook page too.

I had a Twitter account that I never really used so I had to learn how it all worked.  I used to think it was place that people told the world what they had for breakfast.  I learned that #hashtags are useful for sorting through content and I will have to get into the habit of using them more often in my tweets,  which I will have to start providing on a regular, consistent basis.   At the same time realize that quality is better than quantity.

I found the Discussion Forums to be a useful place to share lots of interesting information with my classmates and learn a bit about their field of expertise and what their interests were.  The forum discussions are a fantastic learning resource with links to a vast amount of information on the discussion subjects.  I posted my contributions to the blog and I incorporated many of the Web 2.0 Tools and videos posted by my classmates into the resource section of my blog so they can be used for future reference.  Thanks to all my talented classmates for finding them for me.  I have also included some of the course materials I created for the PIDP 3100, 3210 and 3220 courses.  I look upon this blog as a research portal I can use as I complete the PID Program.

digital bloom pyramid author samantha penney cc

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. Author: Samantha Penney

So what are my overall feelings as the course comes to an end?  Hopefully I will get to meet some of my classmates face to face as I continue my studies.  Unfortunately I wasn’t able to access the ooVoo chats so I missed out on a crucial aspect of forming an online study community.  I don’t feel I made the same level of connection with my classmates as I have when I took classroom courses.  It is just part of being flesh and blood human beings we are part of nature and we need that personal connection.  A primevial part of me feels sorry for the people I see around me immersed in their digital devices.  How will they hear the predator that’s sneaking up to devour them?

Thanks Brian for facilitating the course and thanks to my classmates for providing such an immense amount of information on digital instruction and online learning.  I will continue to follow your blogs, your tweets and your Facebook posts.  I learned a lot about how technology is rapidly changing the delivery of education online from the brick and mortar institutions and how can this best serve our learners.  As an adult educators I realize that technology is just a tool I need to master in order to facilitate learning and understanding amongst my students.  This course is just a start.

Videos

These are some videos posted by my PIDP 3240 class

How to create QR Codes

TED 3d Printing

Paperless Assignments

Wordclass Online Tutoring

How not to Network

The Digestive System: Crash Course

Web Search Strategies

Holographic Telepresence

What is Active Learning?

Scatron Forms

Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams

How to Use Technology in Education (21st century education)

Technology in the Classroom: Digital Media

Pecha Kucha: Get to the PowerPoint in 20 Slides

pecha-kucha in the classroom

Pronouncing Pecha Kucha

Pecha Kucha: Get to the PowerPoint in 20 Slides

Pecha Kucha Night Vancouver – Ernesto Gomez

Virtual Career Fair

Immune Attack Trailer

LinkedIn Tutorial 2014 – Introduction / What is LinkedIn?

Schoology Tutorial

Quick Overview of Blackboard

The Jing project- a free screen capture program.

Educational Uses of Second Life

Virtual Reality Classroom Trains Teachers

Get to know your smartboard

SMART Boards Why are they so easy to use?

SMART BOARD IN HIGHER EDUCATION

5 Ways to Use Powtoon in the Classroom

Powtoon! in the Classroom

Using Blogs as Instructional Strategies

Speed Grader – Instructure Canvas Feature Highlight

How to make a jeopardy game in powerpoint!

Using the iPad to Take Notes

One Laptop per Child

History Of Instructional Media

Life After Death by Powerpoint 2010

Duarte Design’s Five Rules for Presentations

Nancy Duarte talks at TEDx East

Make a Presentation Like Steve Jobs

Wikis in Plain English

SlideRocket Demo Video

Adam Bellow’s Educational Tech Commandments

DC Machine – Simtel Basic Electrical and Electronics

Leap Motion With Windows

Autodesk Reaches into New Worlds of 3D Design with Leap Motion

Learning A-Z Intro

Socrative in the Classroom

GETTING STARTED WITH ELLUMINATE LIVE!

Convert iPhone Voice Memo to MP3

Three Year Old Reading to Little Brother Using Sign Language

RSA Animate – Changing Education Paradigms

Learning Graphic Facilitation – 7 Elements by Bigger Picture

Twitter in Plain English

How To Add Some Flip Chart Magic To Your Presentation

TED – What we are Learning from Online Education

TED – Let’s use Video to Reinvent Education

TED – The thrilling potential of SixthSense technology

Using Student Mobiles as Voting Devices with Turning Technologies RepsonseWare

Android Wear: Information that moves with you

Elmo P10 Document Camera Tutorial

Get to know your smartboard – SMART tutorials for teachers

Dealing Fairly with Copyright-Protected Works of Others

What is Fair Dealing? A Copyright Lecture with Alan Kilpatrick

21st Century Education

TED – How YouTube thinks about copyright

YouTube Copyright Basics (Global)

Turnitin – Introductory Video

Locate copyright friendly images with Compfight.com for an Educatiional Media Project

Our Future with Bill C-11

Elizabeth May: Copyright Modernization Act (Bill C-11)

TED – A free digital library

Creative Commons & Copyright Info

Jay O’Callahan: The Power of Storytelling

Mastering the Chaos – Managing a Flipped Classroom

Salman Khan Describes Future Classrooms with Blended Learning

The Basics of Blended Learning

Blended Learning in Plain English

Blended Learning and Technology Integration

Seth Godin on Education Reform

TED – Your body language shapes who you are

How to use YouTube annotations

TED – Your brain on video games

Information Literacy: Not All Information is Created Equally!

E-learning: How to deliver an engaging Virtual Classroom presentation

Using Skype in the Classroom

Video Conferencing in the Classroom of the Future

What is Web 2.0? What is Social Media? What comes next??

TED – 3 rules to spark learning

TED – Deb Roy: The birth of a word

Top ten tips for using technology in the classroom

How is Technology Transforming Education? Sir Ken Robinson

TED – How social media can make history

The Brain: No Limits Mind Mapping and Information Management

Douglas Thomas on Video Game Learning: Interacting With Media

Cloud Computing for Education

TED – The Gaming of Educational Transformation

Digital World: Teachers Today

The Future of Digital Learning

A Vision of K-12 Students Today

Education Today and Tomorrow

Networked Student

CompTracker: Replace Paper!

The Internet & A Baby’s Brain

e-portfolios for starters

Moving Windmills: The William Kamkwamba story

The Gaming of Educational Transformation

Desire2Learn v10: Overview for Students

Mastering the Chaos – Managing a Flipped Classroom

 

e-apprenticeship

Thanks to Allen Beliveau from my PIDP 3240 course  for posting the paper by Bradley D. Hartwig from SFU Faculty of Education “e-Apprenticeship: Establishing Viability of Modern Technology in Traditional Practice”.  Published in 2007 the paper looked at the views of apprentices towards learning their trade online rather than at a traditional vocational institution.  It also looked at the history of the BC apprenticeship system and apprenticeships in general.

One of the problems of the present system is that many apprentices must travel to attend school.  This entails added expenses at the same time you are not working and earning a wage.  In some cases EI will pay you but this is still a reduction in income.  In an e-apprenticeship the apprentice would learn their theory online while doing their practical work in their workplace.  Since there is a 30% non-completion rate for BC apprentices it is simple economics to remove any barriers we can to make sure apprentices successfully become journeypersons.

One disadvantage of this approach is that many employers look upon apprentices as a source of cheap labour.  Many can spend their whole apprenticeship doing a limited variety of the trade related tasks.  Government and institutions would have to spend a large amount of money to develop a comprehensive curriculum and the learning tools to support it.  There would have to be follow up process to make sure that the apprentice was getting the proper coaching and mentoring that similar institutional classes provide.  One advantage of this system is I have heard apprentices returning from school complain about how school failed to replicate the real world conditions of the work place.

Another advantage of an e-apprenticeship is that you can quickly incorporate new technologies and procedures into the curriculum.  In this day and age change is occurring at an ever increasing rate.  A disadvantage of an e-apprenticeship system is that many small and medium sized businesses can not give their apprentices the wild range of training that the curriculum might require.  The government and training institutions would have to insure equality of opportunity for all apprentices right across the province.

The amount of labour and coaching required by online learners is another disadvantage of online learning.  According to Palloff and Pratt (1999) an online course would take 18 hours of instructor time compared to 6.5 to 7.5 hours for a face-to-face lecture course.  There would also be a learning curve in both learner and instructor learning as to how to best utilize the software and learning modules.  This would also require an IT support team as students and instructors ran into computer problems.

One advantage of having the employer take responsibility for the practical training of an apprentice is that it involves them to take more of an interest and ownership over the development of their apprentices.  Journeypersons would have to take on a more meaningful mentorship role.  However one of the main concerns of the apprentices surveyed was that they would miss the camaraderie and connections they get in a classroom.  Also they said they would miss the peer to peer learning and teaching that takes place.  This could be overcome by having gatherings of local apprentices from various trades coming together to learn material common to all trades.  This would also get apprentices out of their trade silos and get new perspectives.

Returning to in-house training of apprentices hearkens back to the days of the medieval guilds.  In some ways going forward is going backwards, but it must be done carefully at this time and involve all stakeholders.  The paper talked about some pilot projects that were using e-apprenticeship and I believe this is the way to proceed.  Since the BC government is investing over $30 million in a new Trades Education facility at Camosun College, e-apprenticeship isn’t on the top of their agenda.

How do you teach this type of welding

 

PIDP 3240 Discussion on media and the teaching learning process

Postings I made in the Discussion on media and the teaching learning process forum for my PIDP 3240 class.

Re: Teaching to Learn, Learning to Teach – Tuesday, 22 April 2014, 2:03 PM

Digital Media: New Learners of the 21st Century is a PBS Frontline show that documents some innovative programs being used in the US to engage primary and secondary students using digital media. Here we see students using new media learn a variety of subjects including math, science and geography.

The program also illustrates how digital media projects can also put the student into the position of teacher to reenforce their learning by actually having them teach their classmates how to use the technology.

In one class students learn how to make video games, this promotes learning by having students incorporate the elements of what makes a good video game into their own game design.

It was mentioned in the program how are present day education system is modelled on a factory system of work and production. This is a model that is rapidly evolving and changing and schools will have to do the same in order to produce students that will be able to thrive in the new world that they will be growing up in.

Re: #Hashtags?!? – Thursday, 24 April 2014, 1:07 PM

One of the key points I have learned in this course is that there is a vast amount of content available to be learned on any subject you might want to teach. As an instructor I see one of the functions that I must perform is that of content curation, finding good sources of content that my students can use. This maybe material shared by my Facebook friends, people I follow on Twitter or material found using a search engine.

On Twitter I find if I search using a hashtag to define subject matter then I will only find tweets pertaining to that subject. This saves me a lot of time in that I don’t have to search through all my tweets to find the tweets on a subject I am interested in.

Hashtags, key words and other methods to make searching easier are greatly appreciated and I plan to use them more in my postings.

Re: The Virtual Classroom – Skype – Thursday, 17 April 2014, 10:17 AM

I have attended panel discussions where one of the panelists participated via Skype and was able to present their point of view and engage in the discussion just as effectively as the panelists who were physically present. They were able to field questions from the audience and give them their answers in return just like the other panelists.

Another area where Skype is being effectively used is in television newscasts. Distant commentators during a crisis can present their report and be interviewed without having to go to a television studio or having to arrange an expensive satellite feed, which depending on the crisis might be physically impossible.

Teleconferencing is another way that Skype can be used to facilitate discussion and interaction without the expense of travel.

This reminds me of the video phones that science fiction promised us during my childhood. The world is definitely shrinking and becoming more interconnected.

Why scholars don’t trust social media? – Thursday, 17 April 2014, 10:00 AM

Here is an article on a new study on the use of social media by university scholars.

“Greenhow surveyed 1,600 researchers and surprisingly found that only 15 percent use Twitter, 28 percent use YouTube and 39 percent use Facebook for professional purposes.”

I found this rather surprising especially as taking this course has exposed me to the amount of online tools and resources available for educators and scholars to use for disseminating their findings. I think in this day and age when many governments are suppressing scientific findings that they find inconvenient it is important for researchers to educate the public and publicize their findings. Also by using social media they can connect with the younger generations who are actively engaged in the world of social media and thus encourage them to take more of an interest in the sciences and scientific research.

Re: Opposite opinions on Bowen’s “Teaching naked” – Wednesday, 16 April 2014, 10:22 AM

Great find Kevin and thank you for posting this. I think back to my own days in school where the big innovation was the use of film. We would sit there in a darkened classroom, watching the flickering images on screen as the projector clattered away in the background, if we were lucky there was enough time for a short discussion. For most of us students this was almost like a free class or a spare. Schools, seeing the impact that television was having on society, thought that replicating this experience by using a medium that combined sound and images would have a big impact in the classroom. i don’t think it did.

Instructors can no longer look at themselves as content providers as there is so much content available online that students can discover for themselves. What instructors can do though is inspire students to search for this content, guide them to the best online sources of information, teach them how to question the validity of the information they find, and help them integrate this information into their learning.

I once took a Saturday seminar where it was all PowerPoint and we followed along with the printout we were given of the slide show. It was a fairly boring process. I use PowerPoint just to show pictures of things that I can’t really include in my lecture to dramatize the subject that I am speaking on. What do you consider an effective use of PowerPoint?

I do agree with Bowen that universities must change if they hope to remain competitive in today’s economy. They just can’t keep passing on their costs to students via tuition increases. Also they have to shift their focus from the arts and humanities to more technical fields of study. To address this issue here in BC the government has upgraded a number of former community colleges to degree granting universities that are competing with the major universities for new students. Here is an article that questions the high cost of investing in a university diploma.

Inspiring Curiosity – Wednesday, 16 April 2014, 10:43 AM

Here is a Ted talk by Ramsey Musallam a chemistry teacher on his philosophy of teaching. I like what he says about how our teaching should inspire curiosity amongst our students. The example of the curiosity of his four year old daughter is representative of all children. It almost seems that rather than building on that natural curiosity that all children have, the educational system seems to channel and choke it off as students learn the prescribed curriculum and complete the required tests in order to see if they learned the information that they were taught.

As instructors I believe that by urging our students to search through the boundless amount of information available on the internet on any given subject that we might want to teach them we can reawaken their natural curiosity and inspire them to become true life long learners.

We should encourage them to go off on tangents and share what they have learned with their classmates. Trail and error is the mother of invention in my opinion.

By inspiring students to use their curiosity we can help them come up with innovative solutions to the problems that we present them and help them become better problem solvers and trouble shooters.

Re: Social Media – Tuesday, 15 April 2014, 12:41 PM

Watching this video I enjoyed how the speaker looked at the historical context of social media. We tend to forget the vast social changes that media inspires. As the video shows up until now media has mirrored the top down organizational model of civilized society. As Joe Liebling wrote, “Freedom of the press is guaranteed only to those who own one.” (The New Yorker, May 14, 1960). Today anyone with a blog or a computer can become a citizen journalist and express their opinions or report on events. Anyone with a digital camera or cell phone can take pictures or video of what is happening around them and broadcast them to a global audience. As instructors I feel we should encourage our students to be creators of content rather than mere consumers of it as I feel we will be seeing a change in our social organizations in the future.

Here is an interesting paper on how Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are exposing corruption and leading to greater transparency. An example of this is the number of incidents of police brutality that are captured on camera and shared on the internet such as the tasering of Robert Dziekański at the Vancouver airport many years ago.

Re: Is the Internet Rotting our Brain? – Friday, 11 April 2014, 9:41 AM

I remember the same question being asked when I was a child in the dawn of the television age about television viewing. As educators we have to look at the profound effect that media has on society so that we can use it wisely.

Up until the invention of the printing press information was passed down orally. The few books that existed were reproduced by hand, usually by monks or other religiously educated people. This allowed the Church tremendous power over information and the interpretation of that information. The printing press allowed people to read and interpret the Bible for themselves and led to Martin Luther and the Reformation movement. The printing press also led to the Age of Reason and the challenge to the divine right of the crown and the rise of modern. democratic, nation states.

Television has also had a tremendous impact on how we interpret information. Television images became more important than the words or content that the accompanied those images. As I mentioned in an earlier post most radio listeners thought Richard Nixon won the 1960 presidential debate, whereas television viewers gave the victory and ultimately the presidency to Kennedy. This gave an immense amount of power to those that controlled and programmed the airwaves.

Now we have the internet that allows individuals much more power over the creation and distribution of content. Anyone with a digital camera can make a video or take a picture and upload it to the internet for the world to see. Anyone can write a blog, a twitter feed, or Facebook posting. We can believe in any concept no matter how outrageous and usually find corroboration online for our beliefs.

Just as the the evolution of media over the centuries caused upheaval and change so will the internet. We will need to encourage new skills and ways of thinking in order to deal with these changes. In closing I would like to put out there that it is not only the internet that is rotting our brain but all screen based activities. What do you think of the conclusion of the 2010 study “Television-and screen-based activity and mental well-being in adults” that concludes, “Sedentary behavior in leisure time is independently associated with poorer mental health scores in a representative population sample.”? Something we should be considering as we teach.

Hamer, M., Stamatakis, E., & Mishra, G. D. (2010). Television-and screen-based activity and mental well-being in adults. American journal of preventive medicine, 38(4), 375-380.

Re: Managing a Flipped Classroom – Monday, 31 March 2014, 12:21 PM

Here is an interesting article I found in Faculty Focus on what does the flipped classroom mean to an online class. I like the idea that the flipped classroom involves not using technology to separate in-class activities and out-of class activities but flipping the focus from the teacher to the student. This allows for greater student engagement and for them to take a more active role in their education.

For further information the authors have formed a consulting company Flip It Consulting with many more resources that you can access

Writing and Technology – Wednesday, 2 April 2014, 11:21 AM

As a member of the baby boomer generation I think of my generation as a transitional generation when it comes to media and technology. Our parent’s generation grew up on the printed word, books, newspapers and magazines, sometimes read while listening to the radio. Then along came television which combined audio sound with video images and had an incredible impact on how we viewed the world. An example of this was the 1960 televised debate between Richard Nixon and John F. Kennedy.

Computer technology rapidly developed over time. My school got its first computer when I was in Grade 11 and it took up a classroom and you inputted data by typing on punch cards. With the advent of the personal computer in the ’70s and 80’s and the rise of the internet in the ’90s digital technology began to dominate our society. This technology allowed us to view a maasive amount of content and to create and distribute our own content to a world wide audience. Yet many teachers today still ask students to write essays, the same process I used in school so many years ago.

In this article Heather Edick builds on Anna Silva’s use of technology to build up writing skills in her class. What I liked about this article was how they technology to get students to create content rather than just consume it. It reminds us of the importance of assessing and planning our teaching around where students are at rather than where we want them to be. Writing is a very important skill as it allows us to organize and communicate our thoughts and to express ourselves. The internet now allows students to share their thoughts with a world wide audience.

In our rush to embrace technology I hope that we don’t lose focus of the fact that we want students to be able to learn new ideas and to be able to understand and communicate them and that good writing skills are necessary in order to do this. I like the idea of using the technology that students are already using in order to get them to improve their writing skills.

Re: The Networked Student – Monday, 24 March 2014, 1:11 PM

 This seems to be the way that future learning is going.  The big advantage of the internet over earlier forms of media such as print, radio and television is that it allows its users to also be participants and create their own content.  Here is an article about a high school class in Hawaii that is using connected learning.

In fact there seems to be a growing body of resources that are appearing as connected and networked learning becomes more popular.  It was here that I found this report of the Connected Learning Research Network that uses case studies in their research into design principles for connected learning.

When we realize that high students spend 9 hours a week engaging in social networking as opposed to the 55% who spend less than an hour a week on reading and writing for school.  The challenge then becomes how can we get students to engage with the internet in order to enhance their learning.

Re: Information Literacy – Tuesday, 18 March 2014, 12:27 PM

The University of Idaho defines information literacy as: “Information Literacy is the ability to identify what information is needed, understand how the information is organized, identify the best sources of information for a given need, locate those sources, evaluate the sources critically, and share that information. It is the knowledge of commonly used research techniques.”

  In the past before the rise of the internet students would do most of their research using the libraries available in their communities to find sources of information.  The amount of information was manageable and students could be assured that they had fully researched their topic using the information available to them.  Also using library sources the students could be secure in the knowledge that the information that they were using was from credible sources.

 Today with the internet the amount of information available to students is unlimited.   In their 2010 report Project Information Literacy found that for 84% of the students the most difficult step was getting started.  Students lacked the ability to frame an inquiry that would narrow down the information into the most relevant and latest available material on the topic that they had defined and were researching.

 What teachers are finding is that even though students may be adept at using computer technology and have grown up with the internet they still need help in framing research topics and questions and evaluating the research sources that they uncover.  Teachers should assess their students abilities and address any deficiencies they find by teaching strategies and directing the students to resources they might use to enhanced their research skills.

 Head, A. J., & Eisenberg, M. B. (2010). Truth Be Told: How College Students Evaluate and Use Information in the Digital Age. Project Information Literacy Progress Report. Project Information Literacy.

Re: Social Learning Theory – Sunday, 16 March 2014, 4:06 PM

 I first heard about Albert Bandura when I was taking the PIDP 3100 course as I was drawn to his social-cognitive theory of learning.  This was due to the fact that when I was learning my steel fabricating trade there was limited opportunity for trade school and all my learning was done on the job watching and listening to the older, experienced journeymen I worked with.

 I was interested to learn that Bandura worked in construction on the Alaska Highway northern Canada for a season.  His biographers mention that he was profoundly affected by this experience.  I can see that social learning theory owes much to the way that apprentices learn on the job by modelling the behaviour of older workers that they find to be successful.  One of the greatest thrills that a journeyperson has is when an apprentice masters a new skill and is anxious to move on and learn more.

Reports and Statistics

A collection of reports and statistics relating to adult education, apprenticeship training and other related subjects.

 Louise Desjardins (2008).  A Glance at the Participation of Adult Workers in Formal, Job-related Training Activities or Education in 2008.  Statistics Canada

Council of Ministers of Education Canada (2012).  Adult
Learning and Education: Canada progress report for
the UNESCO Global Report on Adult Learning and Education
(GRALE) and the end of the United Nations Literacy
Decade.

Statistics Canada (2012).  Problem-solving Skills and Labour Market Outcomes – Results from the Latest Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey .

McMullen, Kathryn Statscan (2008).  Recent trends in adult education and training in Canada.

Skof, Karl (2010).  Trends in the Trades: Registered Apprenticeship Registrations, Completions and Certification, 1991 to 2007.

Zarifis, George K.  (2008).  VET trainers in public and private training institutions.

Web 2.0 Tools

These were posted in the Discussion Forum for my PIDP 3240 course with a brief description from each posting

Animoto – “Animoto can be used to make a video slideshow from your images. There is a free “lite” account or more advanced paid options. by Shelley Weisser

Babbel – “Is a great tool for those studying language but a word of caution sometimes the translation is not always perfectly aligned with the context. ” by Stephanie Smith

Blabberize – “Blabberize is a free web 2.0 tool that allows you to quickly create a talking photo; it takes images and allows them to speak.” by Nicoletter Brewster

Blendspace – “Anyone who signs up for a subscription account can create a “canvas” and pull in other materials–from videos to URLs to plain old text. They can annotate the pieces, then share their collection with either students or teachers.” by Vara Hagreen

Bubble.us – “Bubbl.us is a free application to brainstorm online.  It is marketed as a brainstorming made simple and that is exactly what it is.” by Talisa Ramos

Chalkup – “Students and teachers depend on Chalkup every day to collaborate and stay engaged with their classes.”  by David Maidman

Conceptboard – “Conceptboard provides an easy online whiteboard application for presentations and group work.” by Vara Hagreen

Crocdoc – “Crocodoc converts Microsoft documents and PDFdocuments to HTML5 so your users view them right on your web app.” by Talisa Ramos

Confluence – “Confluence is a wiki tool, similar to the format of Wikipedia, which uses its own set of code to allow users to create web spaces for communication and collaboration. Within a wiki space a user can upload files for others to see and create discussions through commenting and blogging.” by Daniel Brenner

Doodle – “Doodle is an web tool to help you schedule meetings. It is fast and very easy to use. ” by Joe Kelley

Dropbox – “Dropbox is a cloud-based application that lets you easily store and share files with others.” by Joe Kelley

Drop.io – “This allows you to store and share digital files which is a great device for sharing presentations and saving student work.” by Amber Donovan

Easybib – “If you type in a sentence, it will search either in Websites, books, newspaper, and many more other, and give you the original source.” by Kevin Ma

Edmodo – “Edmodo is a free, secure “social learning platform” website for teachers and students.” by Nicolette Brewster

Evernote – “This has been created for the note taker!  It has been described as the digital filing cabinet and can also be used as a journal or task manager. ” by Stephanie Smith

Ezvid – “It is free, supports all Windows platforms (including XP SP3, Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8), and can make a slideshow or video in less than 3 minutes.” by Vara Hagreen

Flipboard – “Flipboard is a great tool for collecting and sharing news from a variety of sources.” by Shelley Weisser

Glogster – “This is a great site to share images and posters with students, friends and family.” by Talisa Ramos

GoogleDocs – ” This Web 2.0 Tool allows you to create documents online, including spreadsheets.  Any document that is saved in your account can be accessed anytime and anywhere giving you the ability to have ease of mind when dealing with saved documents.” by Amber Donovan

Grammarbase – “GrammarBase checks all grammar errors and I would find this very helpful when creating curriculum documents!” by Amber Donovan

Livebinders – “Livebinders allows you to store websites, pdfs, word documents, and images in a convenient digital binder that is stored online. ” by Vara Hagreen

Meograph – “Meograph helps easily create, watch and share interactive stories. You can make the interactive stories based on what you did or big events for you. Then upload it and share with your friends.” by Nicolette Brewster

Padlet – “Padlet is a free application where you can create an online bulletin board to display information, images, links, videos, and more.” by shelley Weisser

PBworks – I have come across PBworks and find it very interesting and could be a great resource for the classroom.” by Allen Beliveau

Phone.io – “This applet allows you to record your voice messages and upload them to iTunes as a podcast, embed them into articles on your blog or website.” by Amber Donovan

PhotoPeach – “Using PhotoPeach, you can put together slideshows with your photos, put it to music, and add captions. You can also post it to various sites from PhotoPeach.” by Shelley Weisser

Piktochart – “Piktochart is a site that lets you easily create infographics” by Joe Kelley

Poll Everywhere – “You post a question to the audience using this App. They answer in real time using mobile phones, Twitter, or web browsers.” by Kevin Ma

Printwhatyoulike – “This Web tool lets you print a web page by entering its URL.  Instead of printout the whole web page as is, it lets you delete any advertising, images or other icons that you do not want.” by Kevin Ma

Scoopit – “Scoopit is a website that allows you to create topics and using tags to search the content provided by other users as well as the web.” by David Maidman

Storybird – “Storybird is a Web 2.0 tool that lets you make digital stories. Might be a neat way to do a digital lesson!” by Stephen Gilles

Storybuilder – “I found this creative story building tool via the Toronto public library. I can see how children can use their skills and creativity with this tool.” by Philip Ponchet

SurveyMonkey – “SurveyMonkey is a great tool for designing, administering and analysing web-based surveys.” by Joe Kelley

Tagxedo – “Tagxedo has taken Wordle a step further by allowing you to create shapes out of your word clouds. ” by Vara Hagreen

Timetoast – “This web 2.0 tool allows you to make a timeline” by Paula Yewchuk

Tineye – “TinEye is a reverse image search engine. It finds out where an image came from, how it is being used, if modified versions of the image exist, or if there is a higher resolution version. ” by Talisa Ramos

Turboscan – “I love this IOS app. It quickly scans mulitpage documents into high quality PDF’s.” by Talisa Ramos

Twiducate – “Twiducate uses a class code rather than email addresses that you use to engage with the site thus respecting students privacy.” by David Maidman

Wikispaces Classroom – “Wikispaces Classroom describes itself as a site that involves “social writing with formative assessment”.  You can set up different learning projects and organize students in different groups.” by David Maidman

Wordle – “You can create word clouds by pasting or entering text into the application and it will then churn out an image of all the words arranged in a picture. ” by Nicolette Brewster

Zoho Docs – ” Allows you to collaborate and create documents online.” by David Maidman

Zoho Notebook – “Allows you to create a multimedia notebook collaboratively.” by David Maidman