Videos

These are some videos posted by my PIDP 3240 class

How to create QR Codes

TED 3d Printing

Paperless Assignments

Wordclass Online Tutoring

How not to Network

The Digestive System: Crash Course

Web Search Strategies

Holographic Telepresence

What is Active Learning?

Scatron Forms

Randy Pausch Last Lecture: Achieving Your Childhood Dreams

How to Use Technology in Education (21st century education)

Technology in the Classroom: Digital Media

Pecha Kucha: Get to the PowerPoint in 20 Slides

pecha-kucha in the classroom

Pronouncing Pecha Kucha

Pecha Kucha: Get to the PowerPoint in 20 Slides

Pecha Kucha Night Vancouver – Ernesto Gomez

Virtual Career Fair

Immune Attack Trailer

LinkedIn Tutorial 2014 – Introduction / What is LinkedIn?

Schoology Tutorial

Quick Overview of Blackboard

The Jing project- a free screen capture program.

Educational Uses of Second Life

Virtual Reality Classroom Trains Teachers

Get to know your smartboard

SMART Boards Why are they so easy to use?

SMART BOARD IN HIGHER EDUCATION

5 Ways to Use Powtoon in the Classroom

Powtoon! in the Classroom

Using Blogs as Instructional Strategies

Speed Grader – Instructure Canvas Feature Highlight

How to make a jeopardy game in powerpoint!

Using the iPad to Take Notes

One Laptop per Child

History Of Instructional Media

Life After Death by Powerpoint 2010

Duarte Design’s Five Rules for Presentations

Nancy Duarte talks at TEDx East

Make a Presentation Like Steve Jobs

Wikis in Plain English

SlideRocket Demo Video

Adam Bellow’s Educational Tech Commandments

DC Machine – Simtel Basic Electrical and Electronics

Leap Motion With Windows

Autodesk Reaches into New Worlds of 3D Design with Leap Motion

Learning A-Z Intro

Socrative in the Classroom

GETTING STARTED WITH ELLUMINATE LIVE!

Convert iPhone Voice Memo to MP3

Three Year Old Reading to Little Brother Using Sign Language

RSA Animate – Changing Education Paradigms

Learning Graphic Facilitation – 7 Elements by Bigger Picture

Twitter in Plain English

How To Add Some Flip Chart Magic To Your Presentation

TED – What we are Learning from Online Education

TED – Let’s use Video to Reinvent Education

TED – The thrilling potential of SixthSense technology

Using Student Mobiles as Voting Devices with Turning Technologies RepsonseWare

Android Wear: Information that moves with you

Elmo P10 Document Camera Tutorial

Get to know your smartboard – SMART tutorials for teachers

Dealing Fairly with Copyright-Protected Works of Others

What is Fair Dealing? A Copyright Lecture with Alan Kilpatrick

21st Century Education

TED – How YouTube thinks about copyright

YouTube Copyright Basics (Global)

Turnitin – Introductory Video

Locate copyright friendly images with Compfight.com for an Educatiional Media Project

Our Future with Bill C-11

Elizabeth May: Copyright Modernization Act (Bill C-11)

TED – A free digital library

Creative Commons & Copyright Info

Jay O’Callahan: The Power of Storytelling

Mastering the Chaos – Managing a Flipped Classroom

Salman Khan Describes Future Classrooms with Blended Learning

The Basics of Blended Learning

Blended Learning in Plain English

Blended Learning and Technology Integration

Seth Godin on Education Reform

TED – Your body language shapes who you are

How to use YouTube annotations

TED – Your brain on video games

Information Literacy: Not All Information is Created Equally!

E-learning: How to deliver an engaging Virtual Classroom presentation

Using Skype in the Classroom

Video Conferencing in the Classroom of the Future

What is Web 2.0? What is Social Media? What comes next??

TED – 3 rules to spark learning

TED – Deb Roy: The birth of a word

Top ten tips for using technology in the classroom

How is Technology Transforming Education? Sir Ken Robinson

TED – How social media can make history

The Brain: No Limits Mind Mapping and Information Management

Douglas Thomas on Video Game Learning: Interacting With Media

Cloud Computing for Education

TED – The Gaming of Educational Transformation

Digital World: Teachers Today

The Future of Digital Learning

A Vision of K-12 Students Today

Education Today and Tomorrow

Networked Student

CompTracker: Replace Paper!

The Internet & A Baby’s Brain

e-portfolios for starters

Moving Windmills: The William Kamkwamba story

The Gaming of Educational Transformation

Desire2Learn v10: Overview for Students

Mastering the Chaos – Managing a Flipped Classroom

 

e-apprenticeship

Thanks to Allen Beliveau from my PIDP 3240 course  for posting the paper by Bradley D. Hartwig from SFU Faculty of Education “e-Apprenticeship: Establishing Viability of Modern Technology in Traditional Practice”.  Published in 2007 the paper looked at the views of apprentices towards learning their trade online rather than at a traditional vocational institution.  It also looked at the history of the BC apprenticeship system and apprenticeships in general.

One of the problems of the present system is that many apprentices must travel to attend school.  This entails added expenses at the same time you are not working and earning a wage.  In some cases EI will pay you but this is still a reduction in income.  In an e-apprenticeship the apprentice would learn their theory online while doing their practical work in their workplace.  Since there is a 30% non-completion rate for BC apprentices it is simple economics to remove any barriers we can to make sure apprentices successfully become journeypersons.

One disadvantage of this approach is that many employers look upon apprentices as a source of cheap labour.  Many can spend their whole apprenticeship doing a limited variety of the trade related tasks.  Government and institutions would have to spend a large amount of money to develop a comprehensive curriculum and the learning tools to support it.  There would have to be follow up process to make sure that the apprentice was getting the proper coaching and mentoring that similar institutional classes provide.  One advantage of this system is I have heard apprentices returning from school complain about how school failed to replicate the real world conditions of the work place.

Another advantage of an e-apprenticeship is that you can quickly incorporate new technologies and procedures into the curriculum.  In this day and age change is occurring at an ever increasing rate.  A disadvantage of an e-apprenticeship system is that many small and medium sized businesses can not give their apprentices the wild range of training that the curriculum might require.  The government and training institutions would have to insure equality of opportunity for all apprentices right across the province.

The amount of labour and coaching required by online learners is another disadvantage of online learning.  According to Palloff and Pratt (1999) an online course would take 18 hours of instructor time compared to 6.5 to 7.5 hours for a face-to-face lecture course.  There would also be a learning curve in both learner and instructor learning as to how to best utilize the software and learning modules.  This would also require an IT support team as students and instructors ran into computer problems.

One advantage of having the employer take responsibility for the practical training of an apprentice is that it involves them to take more of an interest and ownership over the development of their apprentices.  Journeypersons would have to take on a more meaningful mentorship role.  However one of the main concerns of the apprentices surveyed was that they would miss the camaraderie and connections they get in a classroom.  Also they said they would miss the peer to peer learning and teaching that takes place.  This could be overcome by having gatherings of local apprentices from various trades coming together to learn material common to all trades.  This would also get apprentices out of their trade silos and get new perspectives.

Returning to in-house training of apprentices hearkens back to the days of the medieval guilds.  In some ways going forward is going backwards, but it must be done carefully at this time and involve all stakeholders.  The paper talked about some pilot projects that were using e-apprenticeship and I believe this is the way to proceed.  Since the BC government is investing over $30 million in a new Trades Education facility at Camosun College, e-apprenticeship isn’t on the top of their agenda.

How do you teach this type of welding

 

Journeyperson Mentorship Program

In Newfoundland/Labrador the Department of Advanced Education and Skills has a Journeyperson Mentorship Program that provides funds to eligible employers to hire a journeyperson to mentor an apprentice to allow their apprentices to get the training and hours to complete their apprenticeship.

Journeypersons in provincially recognized trades, that require 4500 hours or more of combined school and work hours are eligible to be mentors.  An employer can choose a person who is currently employed in their field or is retired from their field who has at least five years experience.

This program is open to private employers particularly small and medium sized businesses in the profit or non-profit sector who “Have the capacity to employ a minimum of three apprentices and pay all associated employment expenses from own resources.”  They must also have an office location base in the province and be able to provide a minimum of six months work in the trade.

Apprentices must be registered with the provincial apprenticeship program or be eligible to register.  Journeyperson/mentors must have a “Certificate of Qualification” in a NL designated trade along with a minimum of five years experience with a minimum of two years employment as a journeyperson in the trade in the last ten years.

This is a great idea for the employers because it compensates companies that train apprentices by allowing them to hire skilled journeypersons to mentor and train them, building a productive team of employees.  It is good for journeypersons because it encourages them to take a more active role in training and mentoring apprentices.  It reaches out to our retired journeypersons and allows them to share their knowledge acquired over years of work in the field.  Finally for apprentices they get the training, mentoring and hours so they can successfully complete their trade and maybe one day become mentors themselves.

Advance Education and Skills

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BC and Adult Education

BC faces a looming crisis.  In their submission the Select Standing Committee on Finance in 2013 BC Colleges stated that 78% of the job openings will require some form of post-secondary education while currently only 60% of the population has that level of education.  This they describe as a skills gap.

Recognizing this the BC government has proposed new funding to address the skills gap that the province faces.  Yet faced with budget shortfalls local school boards are cutting programs that are viewed as being outside their core mandate of providing basic kindergarden to Grade 12 education.  Recently the Vancouver School Board closed the adult education centre in the city’s west end and in Salmon Arm the local school board axed their continuing education program.

This seems like a contradiction to me and it suggests that maybe now is the time to reorganize our education system.  Governments have to start looking at education funding as an investment rather than a cost.  BC Colleges claim that they return $3.80 for every $1 of taxpayer financial they get.  One major problem that we face is that government is having to use their meagre resources to substitute for the lack of investment in training by the business community.

imgres Maybe it is time for the provincial government to either take the responsibility for adult and continuing education away from local school boards or adequately fund these programs on top of the grants that school boards already receive.   Perhaps this could be done in coordination with the BC Jobs Plan and the government of Canada’s Economic Action Plan to make sure that the training matches the needed skills.  In Canada the senior levels of government have more funding resources than the locally funded school boards.  It is their responsibility to make sure that valuable continuing education courses are available and that BC citizens can continue to be life long learners.

Employers Needed

As a graduate of the Durham College welding program I found this article interesting as it spoke to something that I have witnessed over the span of my working life, the looming shortage of trades people.  One of the big problems that we have in Canada is a lack of on the job training that an apprenticeship program requires.  The Conference Board of Canada in 2011 found that spending for on-the-job training had dropped 40% since peaking in 1993.  This despite the fact that a study by the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum found that employers received $1.47 for every $1.00 spent on training.

The new federal government program of Apprenticeship grants and  will only work if employers get on board and hire more apprentices.   To this end the government is working with the provinces to bring in the Canada Job Grant program.  This program will provide $15,000 per person so Canadians can access the training they will need to get jobs in the high-demand fields.  It is hoped that this will encourage Canadian businesses to take on and train more apprentices.

Some employers are trying to get around the skilled labour shortage by bringing in foreign trained workers through the Temporary Foreign Worker program.  This despite an unemployment rate of 13.9% among youths 15  to 24 in January 2014, almost 400,000 young Canadians.  If they are truly concerned about the future employers should be looking to partner with government and educational institutes to train and create opportunities for these young people.

As more and more baby boomers retire from the skilled trades we will need more and more young people to step in and take over.  Apprenticeship is one of the most important mechanisms we have to ensure that we will have a skilled workforce in the future.

Canada-Fed-Skilled-Worker1-300x251

A “Connected Learning” Experience

Today I had a perfect example of what is meant by “connected learning” in the age of the internet. I was on my computer working on PIDP 3240 Media Enhanced Learning a course I am taking in pursuit of my Provincial Instructors Diploma.  Part of the course consists of finding and evaluating Web 2.0 tools.  One such tool I found was Scoop.it a site that uses human curation, along with algorithms to sort and evaluate content into Scoops, pages that are organized according to tags that you provide.

I created an account and set up a topic called Adult Education using: teaching,adult,technology,social media,education, learning as my keywords.  One of the first articles of the 100 in the list was “Theory of Knowledge, Social Media and Connected Learning in High School” on the digital media and learning central site.  The article introduced me to the concept of connected learning.

cl spheres

A Learning Approach Designed for the Demands and Opportunities of the Digital Age: Powerful, Relevant, Engaging

Logging into my account today I there was a Scoop from the connected learning research network.  I went to their publications page to see if there was anything I could use for my PIDP course and I came across “Re-Mediating Current Activity for the Future” by Kris. D. Gutierrez.  It must have been something about the title of the the mention of “growing poverty and inequity” in the short description but I decided to read the paper.  The paper was about American educator Mike Rose and his methodology that has come to be associated with cultural historical activity theory (CH/AT).  I became intrigued by Mike Rose and googled him to read more of his articles and papers.

The first thing I read was an article in American Scholar “Blue Collar Brilliance”.  As a blue collar worker myself the choice was obvious.  It was an autobiographical piece that described his mother who was a waitress and talked about the cognitive skills involved in her job.  He described other relatives who worked in blue collar jobs and how they used their intelligence as well as their psychomotor skills in doing their jobs.

MikeRoseTheMindAtWork

Staying with the American Scholar I next read “When the Light Goes On” in which Mike Rose describes his high school education, how a mix up had him in the vocational stream.  Later he was transferred to the academic stream where he languished in mediocracy until he was inspired by his senior year English teacher.  This reminded me of my own high school years where we streamed into arts/science, business or technical courses for four or for those going onto university five years.  In Grade nine at the age of 13 or 14 we were supposed to have some idea of what career we wanted to pursue.

Next I read  Sara Goldrick-Rab’s paper “Comments on Mike Rose’s Essay “Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide” which prompted me to read Mike Rose himself “Rethinking Remedial Education and the Academic-Vocational Divide”.

So what did I get out of all this?  Was I just surfing the web or did I actually have a learning experience?  It made me consider something I have been witnessing for a long time in my industry that more and more of the cognitive work and planning is being taken out of the scope of blue collar workers at the point of production and is being managed by workers in the office.  This is dangerous because it creates a disconnect which I have seen lead to many errors being made and much productive capacity being lost.  It leads to a disengagement of the workers and lack of a team effort between white and blue collar workers in a company.

In my teaching practice I want to be able to not only teach my craft but to teach it in such a way that it engages my student’s imagination and inspires their intellectual appetites to learn more.  I don’t want to turn out automatons who can perform tasks with machine like precision as they will soon be replaced by machines.  Rather I want them to develop the critical thinking skills, to be life long learners and to have the ability to work as part of a team as these skills will always keep them on track and current in whatever career path they choose.

Selkirk-College-Industry-Trades-Training-Equipment-4

Facebook and Higher Edcuation

Social networking sites have become a major part of young people’s lives.  Many professors are angered when students will check their Facebook feeds while attending class while others are embracing the technology and incorporating it into their teaching.  They posit that the interactive nature of Facebook allows students to collaborate and share information.  While many studies have done on the effectiveness of using Facebook in education, the conclusions vary.

In his 2009 paper Neil Selwyn found that students use Facebook to:

(1) recounting and reflecting on the university experience

(2) exchange of practical information

(3) exchange of academic information

(4) displays of supplication and/or disengagement

(5) ‘banter’ (i.e. exchanges of humour and nonsense) (Selwyn, N. 2009. p.161)

He found that students saw Facebook as being part of ‘their’ internet and resented its appropriation by the hierarchal university and suggested that his data showed that Facebook as a “backstage space” that augmented their university education.

One way that Facebook has found to be effective is when it uses Facebook pages to form online study groups.  An example of this is the School of Instructor Education Facebook page allows students to share information that they have found on the internet.  This allows students to access a portal that has much relevant information to their studies rather than tedious searches through a search engine.

Dr. Nisha Malhotra at the University of British Columbia uses Facebook groups to answer student questions, post relevant articles and engender online discussions.  Dr Leah Donlan in her 2012 paper concludes that students are happy using Facebook for academic purposes when it is on their terms as they wish to keep their private and academic lives separate.  This suggests to me that any teacher that wishes to use Facebook in their courses might want to have the students collaborate in designing and defining the Facebook group and how it is to be used.

The use of Facebook and other social media in a formal institutional environment is still in its infancy and much study still needs to be done to assess their effectiveness.  Searching the anecdotal information available one finds many successes and failures, but we have to realize that Facebook is a vital part of student’s lives and it is where they spend much of their time.  As Susan Erdman writes “Perhaps the bruising immediacy and startling intimacy of Facebook will indeed offer a way out of the ritualized

Donlan, L. (2012). Exploring the views of students on the use of Facebook in university teaching and learning. Journal of Further and Higher Education, (ahead-of-print), 1-17.

Erdmann, S. (2013). Facebook Goes to College; Recent Research on Educational Uses of Social Networks. Nordic Journal of Modern Language Methodology2(1).

Selwyn, Neil. “Faceworking: exploring students’ education‐related use of Facebook.” Learning, Media and Technology 34.2 (2009): 157-174.

Selwyn, N. (2012). Social media in higher education. The Europa World of Learning 2012.

universities_facebook

Education for the 21st Century